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Patient Educ Couns. 2020 Jan;103(1):96-102. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2019.08.013. Epub 2019 Aug 12.

Conversations between Latina mothers and their child's mental health provider: An observational study of shared decision-making regarding pediatric patient mental health needs.

Author information

1
Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. Electronic address: katehale@unc.edu.
2
Department of Health Behavior, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
3
East Durham Children's Initiative, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
4
Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
5
Department of Psychological Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA.
6
Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, USA.
7
Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
8
Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
9
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice, Dartmouth College, USA.
10
Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate shared decision-making (SDM) and delineate SDM processes in audio-recorded conversations between language congruent Spanish-/English-speaking clinicians and parents of pediatric mental health patients.

METHODS:

Transcripts from audio-recorded consultations were rated using the 5-Item Observing Patient Involvement in Decision Making (Observer OPTION5) instrument. One hundred encounters between seventeen clinicians and 100 parents were rated. Interrater reliability for total score was 0.98 between two trained coders (ICC range: 0.799-0.879).

RESULTS:

Scores ranged between 0 and 70 on a 100-point scale, with an average total Observer OPTION5 score of 33.2 (SD = 17.36). This corresponded to modest success at mutual shared decision-making. Clinicians and parents both showed effort at identifying a problem with treatment options and engaging in team talk. However, preference elicitation and integration were largely lacking.

CONCLUSION:

The present sample performed on par with other populations studied to date. It expands the evaluation of observed SDM to include Latino patients and new clinician populations.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Use of the Observer OPTION5 Item instrument highlights that eliciting and integrating parent/patient preferences is a skill that requires attention when delivering culturally competent interventions.

KEYWORDS:

Latino mental healthcare; Parent contributions to SDM; Parent-provider communication; Patient engagement; Psychotherapy; Shared decision-making; Spanish

PMID:
31447200
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2019.08.013

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