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Pediatr Cardiol. 2019 Dec;40(8):1553-1558. doi: 10.1007/s00246-019-02185-1. Epub 2019 Aug 24.

Impact of Ethnicity on the Prevalence of Early Repolarization Pattern in Children: Comparison Between Caucasian and African Populations.

Author information

1
Barts Heart Centre, St. Bartholomew's Hospital, West Smithfield, London, EC1A7BE, UK. creta.antonio@gmail.com.
2
Campus Bio-Medico University of Rome, Rome, Italy. creta.antonio@gmail.com.
3
Division of Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, University Hospital of Udine, Udine, Italy.
4
Unit of Cardiology, Campus Bio-Medico University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
5
Hospital of Sant'Antonio, San Daniele del Friuli, Italy.
6
Unit of Pediatrics, Campus Bio-Medico University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
7
Department of Paediatric Cardiology, Paediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children's NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom.
8
Unit of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Management, Campus Bio-Medico University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
9
Cardiothoracic and Vascular Department, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
10
Campus Bio-Medico University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
11
Unit of Neurology, Campus Bio-Medico University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
12
Unit of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Campus Bio-Medico University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
13
Department of Thoracic Surgery and Lung Transplantation, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.
14
Cardiothoracic Department, Division of Cardiology, University Hospital of Udine, Udine, Italy.
15
Geriatric Surgery Unit, Campus Bio-Medico University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
16
Barts Heart Centre, St. Bartholomew's Hospital, West Smithfield, London, EC1A7BE, UK.

Abstract

The patterns and prevalence of early repolarization pattern (ER) in pediatric populations from ethnic backgrounds other than Caucasian have not been determined. Black African children (ages 4-12) from north-west Madagascar were prospectively recruited and their ECGs compared with those of age- and sex-matched Caucasian ethnicity individuals. ER was defined by ≥ 0.1 mV J-point elevation in at least two contiguous inferior and/or lateral ECG leads. A total of 616 children were included. There was a trend toward a higher frequency of ER in the Africans compared to the Caucasians (23.3% vs. 17.1%, respectively, p = 0.053). The subtype (slurred vs. notched) and location of ER (lateral, inferior, or inferior-lateral) were significantly different in the two groups (p < 0.001 and p = 0.020, respectively). There was no significant difference in the number of high-risk ECG features of ERP (i.e., horizontal/descendent pattern, inferior or inferior-lateral location or J-waves ≥ 2 mm) between African and Caucasian children. On the multivariate analysis, African ethnicity was an independent predictive factor of ER (OR 3.57, 95% CI 2.04-6.25, p < 0.001). African children have an increased risk of ER compared to Caucasian counterparts. Future studies should clarify the clinical and prognostic significance of ER in the pediatric population, and whether ethnicity has an impact on the outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Early repolarization; Ethnicity; Pediatrics; Sudden death

PMID:
31446474
DOI:
10.1007/s00246-019-02185-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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