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AIDS Behav. 2019 Aug 23. doi: 10.1007/s10461-019-02631-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Reducing the African American HIV Disease Burden in the Deep South: Addressing the Role of Faith and Spirituality.

Author information

1
Center for Health Equity Research, Brown University, 121 S. Main St, G-810, Providence, RI, 02903, USA. amy_nunn@brown.edu.
2
Rhode Island Public Health Institute, Providence, USA. amy_nunn@brown.edu.
3
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Antlanta, USA.
4
Department of Community Medicine/Population Health, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Tuscaloosa Regional Campus, Tuscaloosa, USA.
5
School of Nursing & Health Studies, University of Washington - Bothell, Bothell, USA.
6
Center for Health Equity Research, Brown University, 121 S. Main St, G-810, Providence, RI, 02903, USA.
7
Rhode Island Public Health Institute, Providence, USA.
8
Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, USA.
9
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, USA.
10
Department of Health Behavior, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, USA.
11
Center for AIDS Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, USA.
12
University of Missouri Kansas City, Kansas City, USA.
13
School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, USA.
14
School of Health and Kinesiology, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, USA.

Abstract

Nearly half of HIV infections in the United States are concentrated among African Americans, and over half of new HIV infections occur in the South. African Americans have poorer outcomes in the entire continua of HIV and PrEP care. Complex social, structural, and behavioral factors contribute to our nation's alarming racial disparities in HIV infection, particularly in the Deep South. Despite the importance of faith, spirituality and religious practice in the lives of many African Americans, there has been little scientific investment exploring how African Americans' religious participation, faith and spirituality may impact our nation's HIV epidemic. This article summarizes the state of the science on this critical issue. We also identify opportunities for new scholarship on how faith, spirituality and religious participation may impact HIV care continuum outcomes in the South and call for greater federal research investment on these issues.

KEYWORDS:

African Americans; Faith-based Organizations; HIV prevention; Southern United States

PMID:
31444712
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-019-02631-4

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