Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Autism Dev Disord. 2019 Dec;49(12):4751-4760. doi: 10.1007/s10803-019-04187-7.

Effects of Overweight or Obesity on Brain Resting State Functional Connectivity of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, College of Human Sciences, Texas Tech University, 1301 Akron Street, Box 1230, Lubbock, TX, 79409-1230, USA. chanaka.kahathuduwa@ttu.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX, USA. chanaka.kahathuduwa@ttu.edu.
3
Department of Laboratory Science and Primary Care, School of Health Professions, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX, USA. chanaka.kahathuduwa@ttu.edu.
4
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, College of Human Sciences, Texas Tech University, 1301 Akron Street, Box 1230, Lubbock, TX, 79409-1230, USA.
5
The Burkhart Center for Autism Education and Research, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA.

Abstract

Evidence on neurophysiological correlates of coexisting autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and overweight/obesity may elucidate mechanisms leading to the observed greater risk of obesity in children with ASD. An exploratory secondary data analysis was performed on resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data of children downloaded from the ABIDE Preprocessed database (n = 81). Children with isolated ASD showed hypo-connectivity between anterior and posterior default mode network (DMN) (p = 0.003; FWER). Children with coexisting ASD and overweight/obesity showed hyper-connectivity between anterior and posterior DMN (p = 0.015; FWER). More evidence is needed to confirm these contrasting rs-fMRI connectivity profiles and to explicate causal inferences regarding neurophysiological mechanisms associated with coexisting ASD and overweight/obesity.

KEYWORDS:

Autism spectrum disorder; Brain; Connectome; Functional neuroimaging; Magnetic resonance imaging; Obesity; Overweight

PMID:
31444629
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-019-04187-7

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center