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Nutrients. 2019 Aug 22;11(9). pii: E1984. doi: 10.3390/nu11091984.

Differences in Serum Magnesium Levels in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients Following One-Anastomosis Gastric Bypass.

Author information

1
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Centre for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, Spitalgasse 23, 1090 Vienna, Austria.
2
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Centre for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, Spitalgasse 23, 1090 Vienna, Austria. igor.grabovac@meduniwien.ac.at.
3
Department of Medicine 1 and Karl Landsteiner Institute for Obesity and Metabolic Disorders, Rudolfstiftung Hospital, Juchgasse 25, 1030 Vienna, Austria.
4
Division of Internal Medicine, General Public Hospital of the Order of Saint Elisabeth, Völkermarkter Straße 15-19, 9020 Klagenfurt, Austria.
5
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, Spitalgasse 23, 1090 Vienna, Austria.
6
Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Spitalgasse 23, 1090 Vienna, Austria.
7
Department of Internal Medicine, Convent of the Brothers of Saint John of God, Seilerstätte 2, 4021 Linz, Austria.
8
Cambridge Centre for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK.
9
Special Institute for Preventive Cardiology and Nutrition-SIPCAN, Rabenfleckweg 8, 5061 Salzburg, Austria.
10
Division of Internal Medicine, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Brüder, Kajetanerplatz 1, 5010 Salzburg, Austria.
11
Clinical Institute for Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Spitalgasse 23, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

Patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are regarded to have reduced serum magnesium (Mg) concentrations. We aimed to assess the changes in serum Mg concentrations at 12-month follow-up in patients, with and without T2DM, who underwent one anastomosis gastric bypass surgery. Overall, 50 patients (80% female, age 42.2 (12.5) years) with morbid obesity (mean baseline BMI 43.8 (4.3) kg/m2) were included in the analysis. Half of the included patients had T2DM diagnosed at baseline, and these patients showed lower serum Mg concentration (0.78 (0.07)) vs. 0.83 (0.05) mmol/L; p = 0.006), higher blood glucose levels (129.9 (41.3) vs. 87.6 (8.1) mg/dL; p < 0.001) as well as HbA1c concentrations (6.7 (1.4) vs. 5.3 (0.5)%; p < 0.001). During follow-up, BMI and glucose levels showed a decrease; however, serum Mg levels remained stable. At baseline 42% of patients were found to be Mg deficient, which was reduced to 33% at six months and to 30% at 12 months follow-up. Moreover, patients with T2DM had an odds ratio of 9.5 (95% CI = 3.0-29.7; p < 0.001) for magnesium deficiency when compared to patients without T2DM. Further research into the role of Mg and its role in T2DM and other obesity-related comorbidities are needed.

KEYWORDS:

obesity; one anastomosis gastric bypass; serum magnesium; type 2 diabetes mellitus

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest. The funders had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, or in the decision to publish the results.

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