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Science. 2019 Aug 23;365(6455):821-825. doi: 10.1126/science.aav9199.

Persistence of neuronal representations through time and damage in the hippocampus.

Author information

1
Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA.
2
Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA. clois@caltech.edu.

Abstract

How do neurons encode long-term memories? Bilateral imaging of neuronal activity in the mouse hippocampus reveals that, from one day to the next, ~40% of neurons change their responsiveness to cues, but thereafter only 1% of cells change per day. Despite these changes, neuronal responses are resilient to a lack of exposure to a previously completed task or to hippocampus lesions. Unlike individual neurons, the responses of which change after a few days, groups of neurons with inter- and intrahemispheric synchronous activity show stable responses for several weeks. The likelihood that a neuron maintains its responsiveness across days is proportional to the number of neurons with which its activity is synchronous. Information stored in individual neurons is relatively labile, but it can be reliably stored in networks of synchronously active neurons.

PMID:
31439798
DOI:
10.1126/science.aav9199

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