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Am J Health Behav. 2019 Sep 1;43(5):877-886. doi: 10.5993/AJHB.43.5.1.

Comparing Multiple Measures of Physical Activity in African-American Adults.

Author information

1
Department of Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Development, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA;, Email: skmama@psu.edu.
2
Department of Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Development, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.
3
Edson College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ.
4
Department of Behavioral Science, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.
5
Department of Population Health Sciences and the Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.
6
USDA ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.
7
Department of Health Disparities Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.

Abstract

Objectives: We assessed the agreement between self-reported and accelerometer-assessed physical activity (PA) in African-American adults by sex, education, income, and weight status. Methods: Participants (N = 274) completed the International PA Questionnaire short form (IPAQS), Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) PA questions, and PA Questionnaire (PAQ) and a 7-day accelerometer protocol using a waist-worn ActiGraph GT3X accelerometer. Interrelationships among PA measures were assessed by sociodemographics. Results: Participants consistently reported doing ≥150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA) per week via self-report measures and did 113.5±179.4 minutes of accelerometer-assessed MVPA/week. Men self-reported and did more MVPA than women (p < .01). Regardless of sex, there were low correlations between self-report and accelerometer-assessed MVPA (r = .092-.190). Poor agreement existed between self-report and accelerometry for classifying participants as meeting PA recommendations (Cohen κ = .054-.136); only half of the participants were classified the same by both self-report and accelerometry. Conclusions: There was generally poor relative agreement between self-report and accelerometer-based assessments of MVPA in this sample of African-American adults. Findings suggest that self-report measures may perform better among African-American women than men, regardless of socioeconomic or weight status.

PMID:
31439095
DOI:
10.5993/AJHB.43.5.1

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