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Kidney Blood Press Res. 2019;44(5):984-992. doi: 10.1159/000501854. Epub 2019 Aug 22.

Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) Inhibition in Kidney Transplant Recipients with Diabetes Mellitus.

Mahling M1,2,3, Schork A1,2,3, Nadalin S4, Fritsche A1,2,3, Heyne N1,2,3, Guthoff M5,6,7.

Author information

1
Department of Diabetology, Endocrinology, Nephrology, Section of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
2
Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholtz Center Munich at the University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
3
German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD e.V.), Neuherberg, Germany.
4
Department of General, Visceral and Transplant Surgery, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
5
Department of Diabetology, Endocrinology, Nephrology, Section of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, martina.guthoff@med.uni-tuebingen.de.
6
Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholtz Center Munich at the University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, martina.guthoff@med.uni-tuebingen.de.
7
German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD e.V.), Neuherberg, Germany, martina.guthoff@med.uni-tuebingen.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibition has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality and preserve kidney function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Kidney transplant recipients with diabetes demonstrate increased risk and accelerated progression of micro- and macrovascular complications and may specifically benefit from SGLT2 inhibition. However, potential concerns of SGLT2 inhibition include volume depletion and urinary tract infections.

OBJECTIVES:

We report data on the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in a case series of ten patients with diabetes after kidney transplantation in order to analyze efficacy, safety, and the effect on renal function.

METHODS:

Patients with a stable allograft function and no history of recurrent urinary tract infections were eligible. The SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin was given as add-on to preexisting antidiabetic treatment with initial dose reduction of the latter.

RESULTS:

Median estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline was 57 mL/min/1.73 m2 and remained stable throughout the follow-up of 12.0 (5.3-12.0) months. Median HbA1c decreased from 7.3 to 7.1%. The rate of urinary tract infections and other side effects was low.

CONCLUSIONS:

SGLT2 inhibition is feasible and well tolerated in selected kidney transplant recipients with diabetes. Whether SGLT2 inhibition is able to reduce cardiovascular mortality and improve allograft survival in these patients has to be addressed in further studies.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes mellitus; Empagliflozin; Kidney transplantation; Renal and cardiovascular endpoints; Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibition

PMID:
31437852
DOI:
10.1159/000501854
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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