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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2019 Aug 19. pii: S0091-6749(19)31048-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2019.07.044. [Epub ahead of print]

Prenatal Oxidative Balance and Risk of Asthma and Allergic Disease in Adolescence.

Author information

1
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse (CoRAL), Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: Joanne_Sordillo@harvardpilgrim.org.
2
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse (CoRAL), Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
4
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.
6
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
7
Division of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.
8
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Fetal oxidative balance (achieved when protective prenatal factors counteract sources of oxidative stress), may be critical for preventing asthma and allergic disease.

OBJECTIVE:

We examined prenatal intakes of hypothesized protective nutrients (including antioxidants) in conjunction with potential sources of oxidative stress, in models for adolescent asthma and allergic disease.

METHODS:

We used data from 996 mother-child pairs in Project Viva. Exposures of interest were maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index and prenatal nutrients (energy-adjusted intakes of vitamins D, C, and E, β-carotene, folate, choline, and n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs)), air pollutant exposures (residence-specific 3rd trimester black carbon or PM2.5), acetaminophen, and smoking. Outcomes were offspring current asthma, allergic rhinitis, and allergen sensitization at a median age of 12.9 years. We performed logistic regression. Continuous exposures were log-transformed and modeled as z-scores.

RESULTS:

We observed protective associations for Vitamin D (OR = 0.69; 95% CI 0.53 to 0.89 for allergic rhinitis), the sum of n-3 PUFAs EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) (OR=0.81, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.99 for current asthma)), and n-3 PUFA alpha linolenic acid (OR=0.78; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.95 for allergen sensitization). Black carbon and PM2.5 were associated with ∼30% elevated risk for allergen sensitization. No multiplicative interactions were observed for protective nutrient intakes with sources of oxidative stress.

CONCLUSIONS:

We identified potential protective prenatal nutrients (Vitamin D, n-3 PUFAs), as well as adverse prenatal pro-oxidant exposures that may alter risk of asthma and allergic disease into adolescence.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma; air pollution; allergic sensitization; antioxidants; nutrients; oxidative balance; oxidative stress; pro-oxidants

PMID:
31437488
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2019.07.044

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