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J Hosp Med. 2019 Nov 1;14(10):682-685. doi: 10.12788/jhm.3263. Epub 2019 Aug 16.

Community Pediatric Hospitalist Workload: Results from a National Survey.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
2
University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington.
3
Pediatric Hospital Medicine Department, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Department of Hospital Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
5
Pediatric Hospital Medicine Department, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.
6
Pediatrics Department, Newton-Wellesley Hospital, Newton, Massachusetts.
7
Pediatric Hospitalist Service, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, New York.
8
Division of Pediatrics and Neo-natology, St. Charles Medical Center, Bend, Oregon.
9
Quantitative Sciences Unit, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
10
University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

Abstract

As a newly recognized subspecialty, understanding programmatic models for pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) programs is vital to lay the groundwork for a sustainable field. Although variability has been described within university-based PHM programs, there remains no national benchmark for community-based PHM programs. In this report, we describe the workload, clinical services, employment, and perception of sustainability of 70 community-based PHM programs in 29 states through a survey of community site leaders. The median hours for a full-time hospitalist was 1,882 hours/year with those employed by community hospitals working 8% more hours/year and viewing appropriate morning pediatric census as 20% higher than those employed by university institutions. Forty-three out of 70 (63%) site leaders perceived their programs as sustainable, with no significant difference by employer structure. Future studies should further explore root causes for workload discrepancies between community and academic employed programs along with establishing potential standards for PHM program development.

PMID:
31433774
PMCID:
PMC6827543
[Available on 2020-11-01]
DOI:
10.12788/jhm.3263

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