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Microorganisms. 2019 Aug 19;7(8). pii: E271. doi: 10.3390/microorganisms7080271.

The Role of Gut Microbiota in Intestinal Inflammation with Respect to Diet and Extrinsic Stressors.

Author information

1
Soonchunhyang Institute of Medi-Bio Science, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan 31151, Korea.
2
Soonchunhyang Institute of Medi-Bio Science, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan 31151, Korea. hykwon@sch.ac.kr.
3
Soonchunhyang Institute of Medi-Bio Science, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan 31151, Korea. yunklee@sch.ac.kr.

Abstract

The gut microbiota maintains a symbiotic relationship with the host and regulates several important functions including host metabolism, immunity, and intestinal barrier function. Intestinal inflammation and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are commonly associated with dysbiosis of the gut microbiota. Alterations in the gut microbiota and associated changes in metabolites as well as disruptions in the intestinal barrier are evidence of the relationship between the gut microbiota and intestinal inflammation. Recent studies have found that many factors may alter the gut microbiota, with the effects of diet being commonly-studied. Extrinsic stressors, including environmental stressors, antibiotic exposure, sleep disturbance, physical activity, and psychological stress, may also play important roles in altering the composition of the gut microbiota. Herein, we discuss the roles of the gut microbiota in intestinal inflammation in relation to diet and other extrinsic stressors.

KEYWORDS:

IBD; diet; dysbiosis; extrinsic stressors; gut microbiota; intestinal inflammation

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