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BMC Cancer. 2019 Aug 20;19(1):822. doi: 10.1186/s12885-019-6040-3.

Hepatitis C virus genotype affects survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

Park HK1, Lee SS2,3,4, Im CB1, Im C1, Cha RR1, Kim WS1, Cho HC5,6, Lee JM1,5,6, Kim HJ1,5,6, Kim TH5,6, Jung WT5,6, Lee OJ5,6.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Gyeongsang National University Changwon Hospital, Changwon, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Gyeongsang National University Changwon Hospital, Changwon, Republic of Korea. 3939lee@naver.com.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine and Gyeongsang National University Hospital, 15, Jinju-daero 816, Jinju, 52727, Republic of Korea. 3939lee@naver.com.
4
Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Republic of Korea. 3939lee@naver.com.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine and Gyeongsang National University Hospital, 15, Jinju-daero 816, Jinju, 52727, Republic of Korea.
6
Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is currently no evidence that hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype affects survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to investigate whether the HCV genotype affected the survival rate of patients with HCV-related HCC.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective cohort study using the data of patients with HCV-related HCC evaluated at two centers in Korea between January 2005 and December 2016. Propensity score matching between genotype 2 patients and non-genotype 2 patients was performed to reduce bias.

RESULTS:

A total of 180 patients were enrolled. Of these, 86, 78, and 16 had genotype 1, genotype 2, and genotype 3 HCV-related HCC, respectively. The median age was 66.0 years, and the median overall survival was 28.6 months. In the entire cohort, patients with genotype 2 had a longer median overall survival (31.7 months) than patients with genotype 1 (28.7 months; P = 0.004) or genotype 3 (15.0 months; P = 0.003). In the propensity score-matched cohort, genotype 2 patients also showed a better survival rate than non-genotype 2 patients (P = 0.007). Genotype 2 patients also had a longer median decompensation-free survival than non-genotype 2 patients (P = 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in recurrence-free survival between genotype 2 and non-genotype 2 patients who underwent curative treatment (P = 0.077). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, non-genotype 2 (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-3.71) remained an independent risk factor for death.

CONCLUSION:

Among patients with HCV-related HCC, those with genotype 2 have better survival.

KEYWORDS:

Genotype; Hepatitis C virus; Hepatocellular carcinoma; Survival

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