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J Alzheimers Dis. 2019;71(3):785-795. doi: 10.3233/JAD-190133.

Self and Informant Memory Reports in FINGER: Associations with Two-Year Cognitive Change.

Author information

1
Public Health Promotion Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
2
Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
3
Neurocenter/ Neurology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
4
University of Oulu, Center for Life Course Health Research, Oulu, Finland.
5
Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and Oulu City Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
6
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet-Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
7
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
8
Hospital District of North Karelia, Joensuu, Finland.
9
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
10
Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden and Department of Social and Psychological Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
11
University of Helsinki, Clinicum, and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
12
South Ostrobothnia Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland and Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
13
Dasman Diabetes Institute, Kuwait City, Kuwait, Danube University Kerms, Krems, Austria and Kind Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
14
Institute of Clinical Medicine/Neurology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
15
Karolinska Institutet Center for Alzheimer Research, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Subjective memory complaints (SMCs) may be the first sign of cognitive decline in aging.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether SMCs reported by oneself and informant predict cognitive change over 2 years among at-risk elderly people, and to determine the relationship of different types of SMCs (prospective and retrospective memory complaints) and change in cognitive function.

METHODS:

This investigation is part of the FINGER project, which is a multicenter randomized controlled trial aiming at preventing cognitive decline in cognitively healthy older adults with increased risk of dementia. A subsample of 303 control-group participants (aged 60-80 years) and their informants (n = 261) rated the frequency of SMCs, using the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ). Cognitive performance was measured at baseline and at 1- and 2-year follow-up visits using a neuropsychological test battery.

RESULTS:

Participants who reported more SMCs improved less in global cognition, executive function, and memory during the subsequent 2 years in the fully-adjusted analyses. Self-reported retrospective memory problems predicted less improvement in all cognitive domains, whereas prospective memory problems did not. Informant-reported memory problems were not linked to subsequent change in cognition.

CONCLUSION:

Our results indicate that self-reported SMCs, measured with PRMQ, predict future cognitive change in several cognitive domains. By contrast, reports by informants were not linked to changes in cognition. Among cognitively healthy at-risk elderly individuals, the persons themselves observe more easily problems relevant for their future cognitive trajectories than their informants.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; cognition; dementia; memory

PMID:
31424391
DOI:
10.3233/JAD-190133

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