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Epilepsy Behav. 2019 Oct;99:106455. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106455. Epub 2019 Aug 13.

A model for visual naming based on spatiotemporal dynamics of ECoG high-gamma modulation.

Author information

1
Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Division of Neurology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States of America; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, United States of America. Electronic address: Ravindra.Arya@cchmc.org.
2
Department of Pediatrics, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, United States of America; Neuroscience Institute, Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, Memphis, TN, United States of America; Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, United States of America.
3
Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Division of Neurology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States of America.
4
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, United States of America; Pediatric Neuroimaging Research Consortium, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States of America.
5
Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Division of Neurology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States of America; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, United States of America.
6
Department of Pediatrics, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, United States of America; Neuroscience Institute, Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, Memphis, TN, United States of America.
7
Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States of America.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We studied spatiotemporal dynamics of electrocorticographic (ECoG) high-gamma modulation (HGM) during visual naming.

METHODS:

In 8 patients, aged 4-19 years, with left hemisphere subdural electrodes, propagation of ECoG HGM during overt visual naming was mapped with trial-averaged time-frequency analysis. Group-level synthesis was performed by transforming all electrodes to a standard space and assigning cortical parcels based on a reference atlas.

RESULTS:

After image display following cortical parcels were activated: inferior occipital, caudal angular, fusiform, and middle temporal gyri, and superior temporal sulcus [0-400 ms]; rostral pars triangularis (A45r), inferior frontal sulcus, caudal dorsolateral premotor cortex (A6cdl) [300-600 ms]; caudal ventrolateral premotor cortex (A6cvl), caudal pars triangularis (A45c), pars opercularis (A44) [400-800 ms]; primary sensorimotor cortex [600-1400 ms], with most prominent HGM in glossolaryngeal region (A4tl). Lastly, auditory cortex (A41/A42) and superior temporal gyrus (A22) were activated [900 ms-1.4 s]. After 1.5 s, HGM decreased globally, except in ventrolateral premotor cortex.

CONCLUSIONS:

During visual naming, ECoG HGM shows a sequential but overlapping spatiotemporal course through cortical regions. We provide neurophysiologic validation for a model of visual naming incorporating both modular and distributed cortical processing. This may explain cognitive deficits seen in some patients after surgery involving HGM naming sites outside perisylvian language cortex.

KEYWORDS:

Epilepsy surgery; Human brain mapping; Neuropsychological deficits; Presurgical language mapping

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