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Pediatr Neurosurg. 2019 Aug 15:1-9. doi: 10.1159/000501696. [Epub ahead of print]

Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting to Characterize Childhood and Young Adult Brain Tumors.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati and the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, peter.deblank@cchmc.org.
2
Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, University Hospitals Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
5
Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospitals Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
6
Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
7
Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
8
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati and the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
9
Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

OBJECT:

Magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) allows rapid, simultaneous mapping of T1 and T2 relaxation times and may be an important diagnostic tool to measure tissue characteristics in pediatric brain tumors. We examined children and young adults with primary brain tumors to determine whether MRF can discriminate tumor from normal-appearing white matter and distinguish tumor grade.

METHODS:

MRF was performed in 23 patients (14 children and 9 young adults) with brain tumors (19 low-grade glioma, 4 high-grade tumors). T1 and T2 values were recorded in regions of solid tumor (ST), peritumoral white matter (PWM), and contralateral white matter (CWM). Nonparametric tests were used for comparison between groups and regions.

RESULTS:

Median scan time for MRF and a sequence for tumor localization was 11 min. MRF-derived T1 and T2 values distinguished ST from CWM (T1: 1,444 ± 254 ms vs. 938 ± 96 ms, p = 0.0002; T2: 61 ± 22 ms vs. 38 ± 9 ms, p = 0.0003) and separated high-grade tumors from low-grade tumors (T1: 1,863 ± 70 ms vs. 1,355 ± 187 ms, p = 0.007; T2: 90 ± 13 ms vs. 56 ± 19 ms, p = 0.013). PWM was distinct from CWM (T1: 1,261 ± 359 ms vs. 933 ± 104 ms, p = 0.0008; T2: 65 ± 51 ms vs. 38 ± 8 ms, p = 0.008), as well as from tumor (T1: 1,261 ± 371 ms vs. 1,462 ± 248 ms, p = 0.047).

CONCLUSIONS:

MRF is a fast sequence that can rapidly distinguish important tissue components in pediatric brain tumor patients. MRF-derived T1 and T2 distinguished tumor from normal-appearing white matter, differentiated tumor grade, and found abnormalities in peritumoral regions. MRF may be useful for rapid quantitative measurement of tissue characteristics and distinguish tumor grade in children and young adults with brain tumors.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent and young adult; Brain tumor; Magnetic resonance fingerprinting; Magnetic resonance imaging; Pediatric; Relaxometry

PMID:
31416081
DOI:
10.1159/000501696

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