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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2019 Aug 12. pii: S0091-6749(19)31033-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2019.07.035. [Epub ahead of print]

Indoor Bacterial Microbiota and the Development of Asthma by 10.5 years of age.

Author information

1
Department of Health Security, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio, Finland; P.O. Box 95, FIN-70701 Kuopio, Finland; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: anne.karvonen@thl.fi.
2
Department of Health Security, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio, Finland; P.O. Box 95, FIN-70701 Kuopio, Finland; Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Yliopistonranta 1, FIN-70210 Kuopio, Finland.
3
Department of Health Security, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio, Finland; P.O. Box 95, FIN-70701 Kuopio, Finland.
4
Plant & Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA; Koshland Hall, 111 Koshland Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; California Department of Public
;Health, Environmental Health Laboratory Branch, Richmond, CA, USA; 850 Marina Bay Parkway, MS G365, Richmond, CA 94804, USA.
5
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Boston, MA, USA; Landmark Center, 401 Park Drive, Suite 401 East Boston, MA 02215, USA.
6
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland; P.O.Box 100, FIN-70029 Kuopio, Finland.
8
Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Germany; Lindwurmstraße 4, D-80337 München, Germany; Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Germany; Institute for Asthma and Allergy Prevention (IAP), Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich, Germany; Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.
9
Department of Health Security, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio, Finland; P.O. Box 95, FIN-70701 Kuopio, Finland; Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; P.O.Box 20, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Early-life indoor bacterial exposure is associated with the risk of asthma but the roles of specific bacterial genera are poorly understood.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether individual bacterial genera in indoor microbiota predict the development of asthma.

METHODS:

Dust samples from living rooms were collected at 2 months of age. The dust microbiota was characterized by Illumina MiSeq sequencing amplicons of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Children (N=373) were followed up for ever asthma until the age of 10.5 years.

RESULTS:

Richness was inversely associated with asthma after adjustments (p=0.03). The phylogenetic microbiota composition in asthmatics' homes was characteristically different from non-asthmatics' homes (weighted UniFrac, adjusted association, PERMANOVA-S, p=0.02). The first two axis scores of principal coordinate analysis of the weighted UniFrac-distance matrix were inversely associated with asthma. Out of 658 genera detected in the dust samples, the relative abundances of 41genera correlated (r>|0.4|) with one of these axes. Lactococcus genus was a risk factor for asthma (aOR 1.36, 95%CI 1.13-1.63 per IQR change). The abundance of twelve bacterial genera (mostly from Actinomycetales order) was associated with lower asthma risk (p<0.10), though not independently of each other. The sum relative abundance of these12 intercorrelated genera was significantly protective and explained majority of the association of richness with less asthma.

CONCLUSION:

Our data confirms that phylogenetic differences in infant home microbiota are associated with subsequent asthma risk and suggest that communities of selected bacteria are more strongly linked to asthma protection than individual bacterial taxon or mere richness.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma development; Lactococcus; children; diversity; environment

PMID:
31415782
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2019.07.035

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