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J Relig Health. 2019 Oct;58(5):1687-1697. doi: 10.1007/s10943-019-00893-9.

Community Intervention for Syrian Refugees in Baltimore City: The Lay Health Educator Program at a Local Mosque.

Author information

1
Medicine for the Greater Good, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 4940 Eastern Avenue, Asthma & Allergy Building, 4th Floor, Baltimore, MD, 21224, USA.
2
Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
3
Department of Theology, Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA.
4
Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA.
5
Division of Geriatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
6
Medicine for the Greater Good, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 4940 Eastern Avenue, Asthma & Allergy Building, 4th Floor, Baltimore, MD, 21224, USA. panagis@jhmi.edu.
7
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. panagis@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

This study focused on a partnership with a mosque in Baltimore, MD, and its impact on the local Syrian refugee population through a peer-to-peer healthcare training program. We implemented the Lay Health Educator Program over a 6-week period in an effort to teach members of the mosque about healthcare-related topics that they could then disseminate to the Syrian refugee population that attends the mosque. Physicians and nurses instructed community members on health, healthcare resources, and healthcare information during 2-h long sessions once a week. A total of 18 community members took part in the program, and their participation highlighted that the most significant health issues for the Syrian refugees are "access to healthcare," "mental health," and insight into certain noncommunicable disease. Finally, the community program graduates implemented several health-related campaigns over 2 years in an effort to disseminate information taught to them. In doing so, they significantly impacted the ability of the refugees to assimilate to the US healthcare system.

KEYWORDS:

Community health; Faith-based intervention; Islam; Refugees

PMID:
31414337
DOI:
10.1007/s10943-019-00893-9

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