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Exp Ther Med. 2019 Sep;18(3):1935-1944. doi: 10.3892/etm.2019.7781. Epub 2019 Jul 17.

Role and effective therapeutic target of gut microbiota in NAFLD/NASH.

Liu Q1,2, Liu S3,4, Chen L2,5, Zhao Z3,4, Du S5, Dong Q3,4, Xin Y1,2,4,5, Xuan S1,2,4.

Author information

1
Medical College of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071, P.R. China.
2
Department of Gastroenterology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, Shandong 266011, P.R. China.
3
Central Laboratories, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, Shandong 266071, P.R. China.
4
Digestive Disease Key Laboratory of Qingdao, Qingdao, Shandong 266071, P.R. China.
5
Department of Infectious Disease, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, Shandong 266011, P.R. China.

Abstract

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most prevalent chronic liver disease in the world, is affected by numerous extrinsic and intrinsic factors, including lifestyle, environment, diet, genetic susceptibility, metabolic syndrome and gut microbiota. Accumulating evidence has proven that gut dysbiosis is significantly associated with the development and progression of NAFLD, and several highly variable species in gut microbiota have been identified. The gut microbiota contributes to NAFLD by abnormal regulation of the liver-gut axis, gut microbial components and microbial metabolites, and affects the secretion of bile acids. Due to the key role of the gut microbiota in NAFLD, it has been regarded as a potential target for the pharmacological and clinical treatment of NAFLD. The present review provides a systematic summary of the characterization of gut microbiota and the significant association between the gut microbiota and NAFLD. The possible mechanisms of how the gut microbiota is involved in promoting the development and progression of NAFLD were also discussed. In addition, the potential therapeutic methods for NAFLD based on the gut microbiota were summarized.

KEYWORDS:

anti-diabetic; gut microbiota; liver-gut axis; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

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