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Nat Commun. 2019 Aug 13;10(1):3651. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-11622-x.

Flavonoid intake is associated with lower mortality in the Danish Diet Cancer and Health Cohort.

Author information

1
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. n.bondonno@ecu.edu.au.
2
School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. n.bondonno@ecu.edu.au.
3
Department of Cardiology, Herlev & Gentofte University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
4
The Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.
5
School of Population and Global Health, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia.
6
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
7
School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
8
The National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
9
The Danish Heart Foundation, Copenhagen, Denmark.
10
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
11
Institute for Global Food Security, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland.
12
Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
13
Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.

Abstract

Flavonoids, plant-derived polyphenolic compounds, have been linked with health benefits. However, evidence from observational studies is incomplete; studies on cancer mortality are scarce and moderating effects of lifestyle risk factors for early mortality are unknown. In this prospective cohort study including 56,048 participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort crosslinked with Danish nationwide registries and followed for 23 years, there are 14,083 deaths. A moderate habitual intake of flavonoids is inversely associated with all-cause, cardiovascular- and cancer-related mortality. This strong association plateaus at intakes of approximately 500 mg/day. Furthermore, the inverse associations between total flavonoid intake and mortality outcomes are stronger and more linear in smokers than in non-smokers, as well as in heavy (>20 g/d) vs. low-moderate (<20 g/d) alcohol consumers. These findings highlight the potential to reduce mortality through recommendations to increase intakes of flavonoid-rich foods, particularly in smokers and high alcohol consumers.

PMID:
31409784
PMCID:
PMC6692395
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-019-11622-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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