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Behav Brain Sci. 2019 Aug 13;42:e120. doi: 10.1017/S0140525X19000918.

Emotions in attacker-defender conflicts.

Author information

1
Laboratory for the Study of Emotion Elicitation and Expression, Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, 1205 Geneva, Switzerlandpatricia.cernadas@unige.chhttp://cms.unige.ch/fapse/EmotionLab/Members/patricia-cernadas-curotto/.
2
Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, University of Geneva, 1202 Genève, Switzerlanddavid.sander@unige.chhttp://cms.unige.ch/fapse/EmotionLab/Members/david-sander/.
3
Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, 46150, Israeleran.halperin@idc.ac.ilhttps://www.eranhalperin.com/.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Geneva, 1202 Genève, Switzerland. olga.klimecki@unige.chhttps://olgaklimecki.com/.

Abstract

The distinction between attackers and defenders might help refine the understanding of the role of emotions in conflicts. Here, we briefly discuss differences between attackers and defenders in terms of appraisals, action tendencies, emotional preferences, and brain activities. Finally, we outline how attackers and defenders may differ in their response to emotion-based interventions that aim to promote conflict resolution.

PMID:
31407990
DOI:
10.1017/S0140525X19000918
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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