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J Bacteriol. 2019 Oct 4;201(21). pii: e00245-19. doi: 10.1128/JB.00245-19. Print 2019 Nov 1.

¡vIVA la DivIVA!

Author information

1
Department of Cell Biology, Microbiology and Molecular Biology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA.
2
Department of Cell Biology, Microbiology and Molecular Biology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA eswara@usf.edu.

Abstract

Reproduction in the bacterial kingdom predominantly occurs through binary fission-a process in which one parental cell is divided into two similarly sized daughter cells. How cell division, in conjunction with cell elongation and chromosome segregation, is orchestrated by a multitude of proteins has been an active area of research spanning the past few decades. Together, the monumental endeavors of multiple laboratories have identified several cell division and cell shape regulators as well as their underlying regulatory mechanisms in rod-shaped Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, which serve as model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. Yet our understanding of bacterial cell division and morphology regulation is far from complete, especially in noncanonical and non-rod-shaped organisms. In this review, we focus on two proteins that are highly conserved in Gram-positive organisms, DivIVA and its homolog GpsB, and attempt to summarize the recent advances in this area of research and discuss their various roles in cell division, cell growth, and chromosome segregation in addition to their interactome and posttranslational regulation.

KEYWORDS:

DivIVA; EzrA; FtsZ; GpsB; PBP; ParA/ParB; Ser/Thr kinase; cell division; cell shape; cell wall

PMID:
31405912
PMCID:
PMC6779457
[Available on 2020-04-04]
DOI:
10.1128/JB.00245-19

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