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Transplant Proc. 2019 Sep;51(7):2469-2472. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2019.01.153. Epub 2019 Aug 9.

Novel Application of Internal-External Drainage Catheter as Biliary Stent for Percutaneous Transhepatic Treatment of Biliary Strictures in Living Donor Liver Transplantation Recipient Patients.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Istanbul Bilim University, Sisli Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Electronic address: servergreen@gmail.com.
2
Department of Radiology, Istanbul Bilim University, Sisli Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
3
Department of Liver Gastroenterology, Istanbul Bilim University, Sisli Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
4
Department of Radiology, Acibadem University, Maslak Acibadem Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
5
Department of Liver Transplantation, Istanbul Bilim University, Sisli Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Although endoscopic management is considered as the first-line treatment for biliary strictures, it may be challenging in living donor liver transplant recipients due to the complex nature of duct-to-duct reconstruction. In this study we present the use of a pigtail drainage catheter as a biliary stent to treat biliary strictures after a living donor liver transplant.

METHODS:

Twenty-seven patients with biliary strictures were treated with our novel technique. In this technique, a pigtail catheter was trimmed into 3 parts (proximal, middle, and distal portions). A suture string was passed through the distal hole of the middle portion, which was then reversed and used as a stent while the proximal portion was used as a pusher. Following balloon dilation of the stenotic segment, the distal, reversed middle, and proximal portions were loaded over the guidewire. After proper placement of the stent, the retractor suture string, pusher, and guidewire were removed. The stent was removed during the third or fourth month of placement through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in all patients.

RESULTS:

No significant complications developed during the procedure or follow-up period. Ten patients required re-stenting by ERCP during the same session. The mean follow-up period was 2 years. Cholestase enzymes and bilirubin levels were within normal limits in all patients during follow-up.

CONCLUSION:

Stents derived from drainage catheter facilitate treatment of biliary strictures in patients not eligible for the retrograde approach. This stent is cheap, easy to implement, can be easily removed by ERCP, and re-stenting can be applicable in retrograde if needed.

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