Format

Send to

Choose Destination
iScience. 2019 Jul 29;19:340-357. doi: 10.1016/j.isci.2019.07.040. [Epub ahead of print]

Coxsackievirus B Persistence Modifies the Proteome and the Secretome of Pancreatic Ductal Cells.

Author information

1
Turku Bioscience Centre, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, FI-20520 Turku, Finland.
2
Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, FI-33014 Tampere, Finland.
3
Center for Infectious Medicine, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm 141 86, Sweden.
4
Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, BioMediTech Institute and Tampere University Hospital, FI-33014 Tampere, Finland.
5
Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, FI-33014 Tampere, Finland; Fimlab Laboratories, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, FI-33520 Tampere, Finland.
6
Turku Bioscience Centre, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, FI-20520 Turku, Finland. Electronic address: riitta.lahesmaa@utu.fi.

Abstract

The group B Coxsackieviruses (CVB), belonging to the Enterovirus genus, can establish persistent infections in human cells. These persistent infections have been linked to chronic diseases including type 1 diabetes. Still, the outcomes of persistent CVB infections in human pancreas are largely unknown. We established persistent CVB infections in a human pancreatic ductal-like cell line PANC-1 using two distinct CVB1 strains and profiled infection-induced changes in cellular protein expression and secretion using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Persistent infections, showing characteristics of carrier-state persistence, were associated with a broad spectrum of changes, including changes in mitochondrial network morphology and energy metabolism and in the regulated secretory pathway. Interestingly, the expression of antiviral immune response proteins, and also several other proteins, differed clearly between the two persistent infections. Our results provide extensive information about the protein-level changes induced by persistent CVB infection and the potential virus-associated variability in the outcomes of these infections.

KEYWORDS:

Biological Sciences; Microbiology; Proteomics; Virology

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center