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Scand J Gastroenterol. 2019 Aug 10:1-7. doi: 10.1080/00365521.2019.1648547. [Epub ahead of print]

Impact of paediatric onset primary sclerosing cholangitis on clinical course and outcome of inflammatory bowel disease: a case-control population-based study in Finland.

Author information

1
a Department of Medicine, Clinic of Gastroenterology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
2
b Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, University of Helsinki and Children's Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
3
c Department of Pathology, Helsinki University and Helsinki University Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.

Abstract

Introduction and aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of a paediatric onset of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a cohort of subjects with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and in a matched-age population-based control group without PSC. Methods: We identified 28 IBD-PSC cases (median age at IBD diagnosis 12.5 years, 25-75th: 10-16 years) and selected three IBD controls for each case matched for age and year of IBD diagnosis. All data regarding the gastrointestinal tract and liver were collected at diagnosis and at last follow-up (median 15 years). Results: At diagnosis the prevalence of pancolitis was similar between the groups (78% and 79%, respectively p = -.30), but histologic inflammation was milder in IBD-PSC (61% vs 30%, p = .06). At last follow-up (median age 29 years) pancolitis was less frequent (6% and 33%, respectively p = .04) and the remission higher (76% and 47%, respectively p = .08) in IBD-PSC patients than in IBD patients. Panproctolectomy (32% in IBD-PSC and 34% in IBD, p = 1.0) and the rate of pouchitis (62% and 70%, respectively p = .8) were similar. Conclusions: The outcome of paediatric onset IBD in patients with PSC in adulthood seems to be comparable to those with IBD only.

KEYWORDS:

Primary sclerosing cholangitis; autoimmune liver disease; colorectal cancer; dysplasia; pouchitis; ulcerative colitis

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