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Metab Eng. 2019 Aug 8;55:268-275. doi: 10.1016/j.ymben.2019.08.007. [Epub ahead of print]

Synthetic microbial consortium with specific roles designated by genetic circuits for cooperative chemical production.

Author information

1
Laboratory for Bioinformatics, Graduate School of Systems Lifesciences, Kyushu University, 729 West Building 5, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka, 819-0395, Japan.
2
Laboratory for Bioinformatics, Graduate School of Systems Lifesciences, Kyushu University, 729 West Building 5, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka, 819-0395, Japan; Division of Metabolomics, Research Center for Transomics Medicine, Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582, Japan.
3
Laboratory for Bioinformatics, Graduate School of Systems Lifesciences, Kyushu University, 729 West Building 5, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka, 819-0395, Japan. Electronic address: taizo@brs.kyushu-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

Synthetic microbial consortia consisting of microorganisms with different synthetic genetic circuits or divided synthetic metabolic pathway components can exert functions that are beyond the capacities of single microorganisms. However, few consortia of microorganisms with different synthetic genetic circuits have been developed. We designed and constructed a synthetic microbial consortium composed of an enzyme-producing strain and a target chemical-producing strain using Escherichia coli for chemical production with efficient saccharification. The enzyme-producing strain harbored a synthetic genetic circuit to produce beta-glucosidase, which converts cellobiose to glucose, destroys itself via the lytic genes, and release the enzyme when the desired cell density is reached. The target chemical-producing strain was programmed by a synthetic genetic circuit to express enzymes in the synthetic metabolic pathway for isopropanol production when the enzyme-producing strain grows until release of the enzyme. Our results demonstrate the benefits of synthetic microbial consortia with distributed tasks for effective chemical production from biomass.

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