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Brain Res Bull. 2019 Aug 7;153:15-23. doi: 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2019.08.004. [Epub ahead of print]

Circulating factors in young blood as potential therapeutic agents for age-related neurodegenerative and neurovascular diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Chongqing General Hospital, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing, 400013, China; Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Chongqing, 400013, China. Electronic address: majingxi@ucas.ac.cn.
2
Department of Neurology, Chongqing General Hospital, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing, 400013, China; Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Chongqing, 400013, China.
3
Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400010, China.
4
Department of Rehabilitation, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400010, China.
5
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, UNT System College of Pharmacy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, Chongqing General Hospital, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing, 400013, China; Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Chongqing, 400013, China. Electronic address: caizhiyou@ucas.ac.cn.

Abstract

Recent animal studies on heterochronic parabiosis (a technique combining the blood circulation of two animals) have revealed that young blood has a powerful rejuvenating effect on brain aging. Circulating factors, especially growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) and C-C motif chemokine 11 (CCL11), may play a key role in this effect, which inspires hope for novel approaches to treating age-related cerebral diseases in humans, such as neurodegenerative and neurovascular diseases. Recently, attempts have begun to translate these astonishing and exciting findings from mice to humans and from bench to bedside. However, increasing reports have shown contradictory data, questioning the capacity of these circulating factors to reverse age-related brain dysfunction. In this review, we summarize the current research on the role of young blood, as well as the circulating factors GDF11 and CCL11, in the aging brain and age-related cerebral diseases. We highlight recent controversies, discuss related challenges and provide a future outlook.

KEYWORDS:

C-C motif chemokine 11; Circulating factor; Growth differentiation factor 11; Neurodegenerative diseases; Neurovascular diseases; Young blood

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