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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2019 Nov;28(11):1861-1867. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-0389. Epub 2019 Aug 9.

Association of BMI, Smoking, and Alcohol with Multiple Myeloma Mortality in Asians: A Pooled Analysis of More than 800,000 Participants in the Asia Cohort Consortium.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Department of Preventive Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan.
2
Division of Cancer Information and Control, Department of Preventive Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan.
3
Division of Descriptive Cancer Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
4
Division of Cancer Statistics, Integration Center for Cancer Control & Information Services, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Department of Global Health Policy, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.
7
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
8
Healis Sekhsaria Institute for Public Health, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
9
Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.
10
Department of Public Health, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
11
Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Nashville, Tennessee.
12
Health Services and Systems Research, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.
13
Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.
14
Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai, China.
15
Department of Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan.
16
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Forensic Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.
17
Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
18
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan.
19
School of Medicine & Big Data Research Center, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taiwan.
20
Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
21
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, UPMC Hillman Cancer Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
22
Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
23
Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
24
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
25
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
26
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Department of Preventive Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. kmatsuo@aichi-cc.jp.
27
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To date, few epidemiologic studies have been conducted to elucidate lifestyle-related risk factors for multiple myeloma in Asia. We investigated the association of body mass index (BMI), smoking, and alcohol intake with the risk of multiple myeloma mortality through a pooled analysis of more than 800,000 participants in the Asia Cohort Consortium.

METHODS:

The analysis included 805,309 participants contributing 10,221,623 person-years of accumulated follow-up across Asia Cohort Consortium cohorts. HRs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the association between BMI, smoking, and alcohol at baseline and the risk of multiple myeloma mortality were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model with shared frailty.

RESULTS:

We observed a statistically significant dose-dependent association between BMI categories and the risk of multiple myeloma mortality (<18.5 kg/m2: HR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.52-1.24; 18.5-24.9 kg/m2: reference; 25.0-29.9 kg/m2: HR = 1.17, 95% CI: 0.94-1.47; ≥30 kg/m2: HR = 1.61, 95% CI: 0.99-2.64, P trend = 0.014). By sex, this association was more apparent in women than in men (P for heterogeneity between sexes = 0.150). We observed no significant associations between smoking or alcohol consumption and risk of multiple myeloma mortality.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study showed that excess body mass is associated with an increased risk of multiple myeloma mortality among Asian populations. In contrast, our results do not support an association between smoking or alcohol consumption and the risk of multiple myeloma mortality in Asian populations.

IMPACT:

This study provides important evidence on the association of BMI, smoking, and alcohol with the risk of multiple myeloma mortality in Asian populations.

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