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NPJ Sci Food. 2019 Aug 6;3:14. doi: 10.1038/s41538-019-0045-9. eCollection 2019.

Wine aging: a bottleneck story.

Author information

1
1Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, AgroSup Dijon, PAM UMR 02 102, 1 Esplanade Erasme, 21000 Dijon, France.
2
2Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, 21000 Dijon, France.
3
3Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Institut Universitaire de la Vigne et du Vin, 1 rue Claude Ladrey, 21000 Dijon, France.
4
13 rue du 8 mai 1945, 21220 Brochon, France.
5
5Research Unit Analytical BioGeoChemistry, Department of Environmental Sciences, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstaedter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany.
6
TUM Technische Universität München, Analytical Food Chemistry, Platform Maximus-von-Imhof-Forum 2, 85354 Freising, Germany.

Abstract

The sporadic oxidation of white wines remains an open question, making wine shelf life a subjective debate. Through a multidisciplinary synoptic approach performed as a remarkable case study on aged bottles of white wine, this work unraveled a yet unexplored route for uncontrolled oxidation. By combining sensory evaluation, chemical and metabolomics analyses of the wine, and investigating oxygen transfer through the bottleneck/stopper, this work elucidates the importance of the glass/cork interface. It shows unambiguously that the transfer of oxygen at the interface between the cork stopper and the glass bottleneck must be considered a potentially significant contributor to oxidation state during the bottle aging, leading to a notable modification of a wine's chemical signature.

KEYWORDS:

Agriculture; Engineering; Materials science

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interestsThe authors declare no competing interests.

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