Format

Send to

Choose Destination
ISME J. 2019 Dec;13(12):3131-3134. doi: 10.1038/s41396-019-0486-9. Epub 2019 Aug 8.

Chemosymbiotic bivalves contribute to the nitrogen budget of seagrass ecosystems.

Author information

1
University of Vienna, Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science, Division of Microbial Ecology, Vienna, Austria. ulisse.cardini@szn.it.
2
Integrative Marine Ecology Department, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, National Institute of Marine Biology, Ecology and Biotechnology, Napoli, Italy. ulisse.cardini@szn.it.
3
Marine Research Institute, University of Klaipeda, Klaipeda, Lithuania. ulisse.cardini@szn.it.
4
Marine Research Institute, University of Klaipeda, Klaipeda, Lithuania.
5
Department of Life Sciences, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.
6
Department of Microbiology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
7
University of Vienna, Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science, Division of Microbial Ecology, Vienna, Austria.
8
Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
9
School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA.
10
University of Vienna, Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science, Department of Environmental Geosciences, Vienna, Austria.
11
HYDRA Marine Sciences GmbH, Sinzheim, Germany.
12
HYDRA Field Station Elba, Campo nell'Elba (LI), Italy.
13
University of Vienna, Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science, Division of Microbial Ecology, Vienna, Austria. petersen@microbial-ecology.net.

Abstract

In many seagrass sediments, lucinid bivalves and their sulfur-oxidizing symbionts are thought to underpin key ecosystem functions, but little is known about their role in nutrient cycles, particularly nitrogen. We used natural stable isotopes, elemental analyses, and stable isotope probing to study the ecological stoichiometry of a lucinid symbiosis in spring and fall. Chemoautotrophy appeared to dominate in fall, when chemoautotrophic carbon fixation rates were up to one order of magnitude higher as compared with the spring, suggesting a flexible nutritional mutualism. In fall, an isotope pool dilution experiment revealed carbon limitation of the symbiosis and ammonium excretion rates up to tenfold higher compared with fluxes reported for nonsymbiotic marine bivalves. These results provide evidence that lucinid bivalves can contribute substantial amounts of ammonium to the ecosystem. Given the preference of seagrasses for this nitrogen source, lucinid bivalves' contribution may boost productivity of these important blue carbon ecosystems.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center