Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2019 Aug 8;14(8):e0219261. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0219261. eCollection 2019.

Whole blood microRNA expression associated with stroke: Results from the Framingham Heart Study.

Salinas J1,2, Lin H1,3, Aparico HJ1,4, Huan T1, Liu C1, Rong J1,4, Beiser A1,4,5, Himali JJ1,4,5, Freedman JE6, Larson MG1,5,7, Rosand J2,8, Soreq H9,10, Levy D1,11, Seshadri S1,4,12.

Author information

1
The Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, Massachusetts, United States of America.
2
The Henry and Allison McCance Center for Brain Health, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
3
Section of Computational Biomedicine, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
4
Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
5
Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
6
Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America.
7
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
8
Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
9
Department of Biological Chemistry, The Life Sciences Institute, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.
10
The Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.
11
The Population Sciences Branch, Division of Intramural Research, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America.
12
Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer's and Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas, United States of America.

Abstract

Emerging evidence suggests microRNAs (miRNAs) may play an important role in explaining variation in stroke risk and recovery in humans, yet there are still few longitudinal studies examining the association between whole blood miRNAs and stroke. Accounting for multiple testing and adjusting for potentially confounding technical and clinical variables, here we show that whole blood miR-574-3p expression was significantly lower in participants with chronic stroke compared to non-cases. To explore the functional relevance of our findings, we analyzed miRNA-mRNA whole blood co-expression, pathway enrichment, and brain tissue gene expression. Results suggest miR-574-3p is involved in neurometabolic and chronic neuronal injury response pathways, including brain gene expression of DBNDD2 and ELOVL1. These results suggest miR-574-3p plays a role in regulating chronic brain and systemic cellular response to stroke and thus may implicate miR-574-3p as a partial mediator of long-term stroke outcomes.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center