Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 1988 Mar;28(3):283-8.

Effects of low dose oral iodide supplementation on thyroid function in normal men.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Medical College of Virginia, Richmond 23298.

Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated that short-term oral iodide administration, in doses ranging from 1500 micrograms to 250 mg/day, has an inhibitory effect on thyroid hormone secretion in normal men. As iodide intake in the USA may be as high as 800 micrograms/d, we investigated the effects of very low dose iodide supplementation on thyroid function. Thirty normal men aged 22-40 years were randomly assigned to receive 500, 1500, and 4500 micrograms iodide/day for 2 weeks. Blood was obtained on days 1 and 15 for measurement of serum T4, T3, T3-charcoal uptake, TSH, protein-bound iodide (PBI) and total iodide, and 24 h urine samples were collected on these days for measurement of urinary iodide excretion. TRH tests were performed before and at the end of the period of iodide administration. Serum inorganic iodide was calculated by subtracting the PBI from the serum total iodide. We found significant dose-related increases in serum total and inorganic iodide concentrations, as well as urinary iodide excretion. The mean serum T4 concentration and free T4 index values decreased significantly at the 1500 micrograms/day and 4500 micrograms/day doses. No changes in T3-charcoal uptake or serum T3 concentration occurred at any dose. Administration of 500 micrograms iodide/day resulted in a significant increase (P less than 0.005) in the serum TSH response to TRH, and the two larger iodide doses resulted in increases in both basal and TRH-stimulated serum TSH concentrations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
3139337
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center