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Cell Metab. 2019 Aug 6;30(2):238-250. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2019.06.019.

Medicine in the Fourth Dimension.

Author information

1
Experimental Audiology, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Department of Biology, Unit of Biochemistry, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.
3
Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
4
Chronobiology and Sleep Research Group, Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
5
SENSORION SA, Montpellier, France.
6
Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia.
7
Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.
8
Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK.
9
Neurobiology and Genetics, Biocenter, Theodor-Boveri Institute, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
11
Cancer Chronotherapy Team, School of Medicine, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK; Warwick University on "Personalized Cancer Chronotherapeutics through System Medicine" (C2SysMed), European Associated Laboratory of the Unité Mixte de Recherche Scientifique 935, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale and Paris-Sud University, Villejuif, France; Department of Medical Oncology, Paul Brousse Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, 94800 Villejuif, France.
12
School of Medicine, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, UK.
13
Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne, Germany.
14
Department of Neurophysiology, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, the Netherlands.
15
Department of Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and National Center for Behavioral Genomics, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02453, USA.
16
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.
17
Laboratory of Genetics, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA.
18
Experimental Audiology, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: barbara.canlon@ki.se.

Abstract

The importance of circadian biology has rarely been considered in pre-clinical studies, and even more when translating to the bedside. Circadian biology is becoming a critical factor for improving drug efficacy and diminishing drug toxicity. Indeed, there is emerging evidence showing that some drugs are more effective at nighttime than daytime, whereas for others it is the opposite. This suggests that the biology of the target cell will determine how an organ will respond to a drug at a specific time of the day, thus modulating pharmacodynamics. Thus, it is now time that circadian factors become an integral part of translational research.

KEYWORDS:

ADME; chronotherapy; circadian biology; clock genes; drug metabolism; translation

PMID:
31390550
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2019.06.019

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