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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2019 Aug 7. pii: jc.2019-01081. doi: 10.1210/jc.2019-01081. [Epub ahead of print]

Effects of nicotinamide riboside on endocrine pancreatic function and incretin hormones in obese, non-diabetic men.

Author information

1
Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
2
Medical Research Laboratory, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
3
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
4
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Section for Translational Metabolic Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
5
Department of Endocrinology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
6
Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, Denmark.
7
Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Augmenting NAD+ metabolism through dietary provision of NAD+ precursor vitamins translate to improved glucose handling in rodent models of obesity and diabetes. Preclinical evidence suggests that the NAD+/SIRT1 axis may be implicated in modulating important gut-related aspects of glucose regulation. We aimed to test if NAD+ precursor supplementation with nicotinamide riboside (NR) affects β-cell function, α-cell function, and incretin hormone secretion as well as circulating bile acids levels in humans.

DESIGN:

A 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and parallel-group trial in 40 obese, insulin-resistant males allocated to NR 1,000 mg twice daily (n = 20) or placebo (n = 20).

METHODS:

2-hour 75 gram oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed before and after the intervention and plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP were determined. β-cell function indices were calculated based on glucose, insulin, and C-peptide measurements. Fasting plasma concentrations of bile acids were determined.

RESULTS:

NR supplementation during 12 weeks neither affected fasting nor post-glucose challenge concentrations of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, or GIP, and β-cell function did not respond to the intervention. In addition, no changes in circulating adipsin or bile acids were observed following NR supplementation.

CONCLUSION:

The present study does not provide evidence to support that dietary supplementation with the NAD+ precursor NR serves to impact glucose tolerance, β-cell secretory capacity, α-cell function, and incretin hormone secretion in obese, non-diabetic males. Moreover, bile acid levels in plasma did not change in response to NR supplementation.

PMID:
31390002
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2019-01081

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