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J Perinatol. 2019 Oct;39(10):1406-1410. doi: 10.1038/s41372-019-0449-z. Epub 2019 Aug 6.

Tube feeding outcomes of infants in a Level IV NICU.

Author information

1
Perinatal Institute, Division of Neonatology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
2
University of Cincinnati Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
3
Advent Health for Children, Orlando, FL, USA.
4
Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
5
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
6
Perinatal Institute, Division of Neonatology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA. stephanie.merhar@cchmc.org.
7
University of Cincinnati Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati, OH, USA. stephanie.merhar@cchmc.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

NICU patients are commonly discharged home with nasogastric (NG) or gastrostomy (G-tube) feeding, but wide practice variation exists. The objective of this study was to evaluate feeding and growth outcomes and complications in NICU patients discharged home with NG or G-tube feeding.

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study of infants discharged from a Level IV NICU with an NG or G-tube who had follow up to 1 year. Clinical characteristics and outcomes were compared between groups.

RESULTS:

The study sample included 264 infants: 140 with NG and 124 with G-tube. More infants in the G-tube group (65%) still required tube feedings 12 months post-discharge than infants in the NG group (24%). Infants in the G-tube group had more tube-related ER visits than infants in the NG group. Growth outcomes did not differ.

CONCLUSION:

Home NG feeding may be a safe alternative to a surgically placed G-tube in select NICU patients.

PMID:
31388118
PMCID:
PMC6761028
[Available on 2020-02-06]
DOI:
10.1038/s41372-019-0449-z

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