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Sci Rep. 2019 Aug 6;9(1):11366. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-47909-8.

Successful cloning of a superior buffalo bull.

Author information

1
Division of Animal Physiology and Reproduction, ICAR-Central Institute for Research on Buffaloes, Hisar, 125001, India. selokarnareshlalaji@gmail.com.
2
Division of Animal Physiology and Reproduction, ICAR-Central Institute for Research on Buffaloes, Hisar, 125001, India.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, 110029, India.
4
Systems Biology Group, CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, New Delhi, 110025, India.
5
Laboratory of Calciomics and Systemic Pathophysiology, Regional Centre for Biotechnology, Faridabad, 121001, India.
6
Animal Farm Section, ICAR-Central Institute for Research on Buffaloes, Hisar, 125001, India.
7
Division of Animal Physiology and Reproduction, ICAR-Central Institute for Research on Buffaloes, Hisar, 125001, India. psycirb@gmail.com.

Abstract

Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology provides an opportunity to multiply superior animals that could speed up dissemination of favorable genes into the population. In the present study, we attempted to reproduce a superior breeding bull of Murrah buffalo, the best dairy breed of buffalo, using donor cells that were established from tail-skin biopsy and seminal plasma. We studied several parameters such as cell cycle stages, histone modifications (H3K9ac and H3K27me3) and expression of developmental genes in donor cells to determine their SCNT reprogramming potentials. We successfully produced the cloned bull from an embryo that was produced from the skin-derived cell. Growth, blood hematology, plasma biochemistries, and reproductive organs of the produced cloned bull were found normal. Subsequently, the bull was employed for semen production. Semen parameters such as CASA (Computer Assisted Semen Analysis) variables and in vitro fertilizing ability of sperms of the cloned bull were found similar to non-cloned bulls, including the donor bull. At present, we have 12 live healthy progenies that were produced using artificial insemination of frozen semen of the cloned bull, which indicate that the cloned bull is fertile and can be utilized in the buffalo breeding schemes. Taken together, we demonstrate that SCNT can be used to reproduce superior buffalo bulls.

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