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Psychiatry Res. 2019 Aug 3:112492. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2019.112492. [Epub ahead of print]

Sleep problems and attenuated psychotic symptoms in youth at clinical high-risk for psychosis.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Emory University, 36 Eagle Row, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address: katrina.goines@emory.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; Department of Psychology, Emory University, 36 Eagle Row, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
4
Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior & Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, UCSD, San Diego, CA, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA; Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Zucker Hillside Hospital, New York City, NY, USA.
8
Department of Psychiatry, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, USA; San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA.
9
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
10
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Abstract

There has been growing interest on the effect of sleep problems on psychotic and prodromal symptoms. The current study investigated cross-sectional relations between sleep problems and attenuated psychotic symptoms in a large sample of 740 youth at Clinical High Risk (CHR) for psychosis in an attempt to replicate previous findings and assess whether findings from general population samples and psychotic samples extend to this CHR sample. Sleep problems were found to be significantly positively associated with attenuated psychotic symptom severity. Sleep problems were also found to be more closely associated with certain specific prodromal symptoms (e.g., suspiciousness and perceptual abnormalities) than other attenuated psychotic symptoms. Further, we found that depression mediated the cross-sectional association between sleep problems and paranoid symptoms only. This adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting the mediation role of depression is more pronounced for paranoid-type psychotic symptoms as compared to other psychotic symptoms (e.g., hallucinations).

KEYWORDS:

CHR; Insomnia; Prodromal; Prodrome; Schizophrenia-spectrum

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