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Clin Nutr Res. 2019 Jul 11;8(3):196-208. doi: 10.7762/cnr.2019.8.3.196. eCollection 2019 Jul.

Does Turmeric/curcumin Supplementation Change Anthropometric Indices in Patients with Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Author information

1
Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz 61357-15794, Iran.
2
Nutrition Department, Paramedical School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz 61357-15794, Iran.
3
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad 68138-33946, Iran.
4
Chemical Injuries Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 14359-16471, Iran.
5
Halal Research Center of IRI, FDA, Tehran, Iran.
6
Nutrition and Metabolic Disease Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz 61357-15794, Iran.

Abstract

Curcumin is the principal polylphenol of turmeric that has been used to treat various disorders. However, its anti-obesity effects in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain controversial. Therefore, we aimed to perform a meta-analysis on the effects of supplementation with turmeric/curcumin on body weight, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) in these patients. PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ISI Web of Science were searched until January 2019, without any restrictions. Clinical trials that reported body weight, BMI and WC in patients with NAFLD were included. Weighted mean differences (WMDs) were pooled using a random-effects model. Eight studies (449 participants) fulfilled the eligibility criteria of the present meta-analysis. Overall, meta-analysis could not show any beneficial effect of turmeric/curcumin supplementation on body weight (WMD, -0.54 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.40, 1.31; p = 0.56; I2 = 0.0%), BMI (WMD, -0.21 kg/m2; 95% CI, -0.71, 0.28; p = 0.39; I2 = 0.0%) and WC (WMD, -0.88 cm; 95% CI, -3.76, 2.00; p = 0.54; I2 = 0.0%). Subgroup analysis based on participants' baseline BMI, type of intervention, and study duration did not show any significant association in all subgroups. The results showed that turmeric/curcumin supplementation had no signi´Čücant effect on body weight, BMI and WC in patients with NAFLD. Further studies with large-scale are needed to find out possible anti-obesity effects of turmeric/curcumin.

KEYWORDS:

Anthropometry; Curcumin; Meta-analysis; NAFLD; Turmeric

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of Interest: The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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