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Nat Hum Behav. 2019 Sep;3(9):988-998. doi: 10.1038/s41562-019-0659-6. Epub 2019 Aug 5.

Shared vulnerability for connectome alterations across psychiatric and neurological brain disorders.

Author information

1
Connectome Lab, Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
2
UMC Utrecht Brain Center, Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
3
UMC Utrecht Brain Center, Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Neuroscience, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.
5
Neuroimaging Laboratory, Santa Lucia Foundation IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
6
Altrecht Science, Altrecht Mental Health Institute, Utrecht, Netherlands.
7
Department of Psychiatry, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany.
8
Brain Research and Innovation Centre, Ministry of Defence, Utrecht, Netherlands.
9
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus University Medical Center-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
10
Department of Neuroradiology & TUM-Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), School of Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
11
Graduate School of Systemic Neurosciences GSN, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Biocenter, Munich, Germany.
12
Departament de Psicologia Clínica i Psicobiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
13
Institut de Neurociències, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
14
Institut de Recerca Pediàtrica Hospital Sant Joan de Déu (IRSJD), Barcelona, Spain.
15
Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK.
16
Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London, UK.
17
Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
18
Department of Psychiatry, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
19
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health System, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
20
Connectome Lab, Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, Netherlands. martijn.vanden.heuvel@vu.nl.
21
Department of Clinical Genetics, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, Netherlands. martijn.vanden.heuvel@vu.nl.

Abstract

Macroscale white matter pathways are the infrastructure for large-scale communication in the human brain and a prerequisite for healthy brain function. Disruptions in the brain's connectivity architecture play an important role in many psychiatric and neurological brain disorders. Here we show that connections important for global communication and network integration are particularly vulnerable to brain alterations across multiple brain disorders. We report on a cross-disorder connectome study comprising in total 1,033 patients and 1,154 matched controls across 8 psychiatric and 4 neurological disorders. We extracted disorder connectome fingerprints for each of these 12 disorders and combined them into a 'cross-disorder disconnectivity involvement map' describing the level of cross-disorder involvement of each white matter pathway of the human brain network. Network analysis revealed connections central to global network communication and integration to display high disturbance across disorders, suggesting a general cross-disorder involvement and the importance of these pathways in normal function.

PMID:
31384023
DOI:
10.1038/s41562-019-0659-6

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