Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuroimage. 2019 Aug 2:116070. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116070. [Epub ahead of print]

Transdiagnostic variations in impulsivity and compulsivity in obsessive-compulsive disorder and gambling disorder correlate with effective connectivity in cortical-striatal-thalamic-cortical circuits.

Author information

1
The Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, School of Psychological Sciences, and Monash Biomedical Imaging, Monash University, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: linden.parkes@monash.edu.
2
The Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, School of Psychological Sciences, and Monash Biomedical Imaging, Monash University, Victoria, Australia.
3
The Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, School of Psychological Sciences, and Monash Biomedical Imaging, Monash University, Victoria, Australia; Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne and Melbourne Health, Victoria, Australia.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge and Cambridge Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
5
The Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, School of Psychological Sciences, and Monash Biomedical Imaging, Monash University, Victoria, Australia; Obsessive, Compulsive, and Anxiety Spectrum Research Program, Institute of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro & D'Or Institute for Research and Education, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
6
Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne and Melbourne Health, Victoria, Australia.
7
The Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, School of Psychological Sciences, and Monash Biomedical Imaging, Monash University, Victoria, Australia; School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Australia.
8
School of Psychology, Faculty of Science, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia; Cognition & Philosophy Lab, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
9
Computational and Systems Neuroscience Laboratory, Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience and School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, University College London, United Kingdom; Department of Electronic Engineering, NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, Pakistan.

Abstract

Individual differences in impulsivity and compulsivity is thought to underlie vulnerability to a broad range of disorders and are closely tied to cortical-striatal-thalamic-cortical function. However, whether impulsivity and compulsivity in clinical disorders is continuous with the healthy population and explains cortical-striatal-thalamic-cortical dysfunction across different disorders remains unclear. Here, we characterized the relationship between cortical-striatal-thalamic-cortical effective connectivity, estimated using dynamic causal modelling of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data, and dimensional phenotypes of impulsivity and compulsivity in two symptomatically distinct but phenotypically related disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder and gambling disorder. 487 online participants provided data for modelling of dimensional phenotypes. These data were combined with 34 obsessive-compulsive disorder patients, 22 gambling disorder patients, and 39 healthy controls, who underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Three core dimensions were identified: disinhibition, impulsivity, and compulsivity. Patients' scores on these dimensions were continuously distributed with the healthy participants, supporting a continuum model of psychopathology. Across all participants, higher disinhibition correlated with lower bottom-up connectivity in the dorsal circuit and greater bottom-up connectivity in the ventral circuit, and higher compulsivity correlated with lower bottom-up connectivity in the dorsal circuit. In patients, similar changes in effective connectivity were observed with increasing clinical severity that were not accounted for by phenotypic variation, demonstrating convergence towards behaviourally and clinically relevant changes in brain dynamics. Effective connectivity did not differ as a function of traditional diagnostic labels and no associations were observed for functional connectivity measures. Together, our results demonstrate that cortical-striatal-thalamic-cortical dysfunction across obsessive-compulsive disorder and gambling disorder is better characterized by dimensional phenotypes than diagnostic comparisons, supporting investigation of quantitative liability phenotypes.

KEYWORDS:

Compulsivity; DCM; Disinhibition; GD; Impulsivity; OCD

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center