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J Surg Res. 2019 Nov;243:509-514. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2019.07.003. Epub 2019 Aug 1.

Risk Factors for Wound Complications Following Transmetatarsal Amputation in Patients With Diabetes.

Author information

1
Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York.
2
Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York. Electronic address: daniel.ceradini@nyulangone.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The goal of our study was to evaluate risk factors for wound complications in patients with diabetes mellitus undergoing transmetatarsal amputations (TMAs), given the paucity of research on this subject.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. In this retrospective analysis, all surgical cases with a primary Current Procedural Terminology code for TMA from 2009 to 2015 were reviewed.

RESULTS:

A total of 2316 patients with diabetes mellitus who underwent TMA were identified. Overall wound complications occurred in 276 (11.9%) of patients. Univariate analysis showed that the operative time was significantly longer in patients who developed complications than those who did not (58.3 ± 39.5 versus 50.6 ± 39.4; P = 0.003). Furthermore, the rate of obesity was significantly higher among patients who developed wound complications than those who did not (47.1% versus 41.5%; P = 0.04). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that a longer operative time (odds ratio = 1.02; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.04; P = 0.01) and obesity (odds ratio = 1.60; 95% confidence interval: 1.06-2.40; P = 0.03) were independent risk factors for wound complications in our cohort.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings emphasize the importance of having heightened clinical vigilance in obese patients with diabetes mellitus undergoing this procedure, close postoperative follow-up, and limiting operative time when possible.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes; Outcomes; Transmetatarsal amputation; Wound complications

PMID:
31377491
DOI:
10.1016/j.jss.2019.07.003

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