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J Adolesc Health. 2019 Jul 31. pii: S1054-139X(19)30309-X. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2019.05.019. [Epub ahead of print]

Acceptability of Adolescent Social and Behavioral Health Screening in the Emergency Department.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, The George Washington University, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC.
3
Department of Pediatrics, The George Washington University, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC; Department of Pediatrics, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC.
4
Department of Pediatrics, The George Washington University, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC; Department of Pediatrics, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC. Electronic address: MGoyal@childrensnational.org.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends routine screening for social and behavioral health risks (SBHR) in adolescents. Because adolescents who seek care in emergency departments (EDs) may have riskier behaviors than adolescents who access primary care, the ED may be a strategic additional setting for screening. We sought to identify acceptable domains for comprehensive SBHR screening in a pediatric ED.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional survey to assess adolescent and caregiver acceptance of ED-based SBHR screening across multiple domains. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with screening acceptance. McNemar's test was used to assess agreement within patient/caregiver dyads across domains.

RESULTS:

Among our 516 study participants (347 adolescents and 169 caregivers), those who indicated that they "agree" or "strongly agree" that ED-based screening should be conducted were classified as finding screening acceptable. Acceptability rates ranged from 45.0% (firearm access) to 77.5% (suicidality) among adolescents and 61.5% (firearm access) to 84.0% (substance use) among caregivers. After adjusting for gender, race/ethnicity, and insurance status, adolescents were less accepting than caregivers of screening for: substance use (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: .51; .31, .83; p < .01); violence (aOR: .63; .41, .97; p = .04); depression (aOR: .65; .42, .99; p = .04); human trafficking (aOR: .58; .39, .86; p < .01); and access to firearms (aOR: .47; .32, .70; p < .01). Shared agreement within adolescent/caregiver dyads ranged from 25.2% to 67.1%.

CONCLUSIONS:

A majority of adolescents and caregivers agree that ED-based SBHR screening should be conducted across most domains. Caregivers generally had higher rates of screening acceptance than adolescents.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Behavioral health risks; Emergency service; Hospital; Screening; Social determinants of health

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