Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Chest Med. 2019 Sep;40(3):637-654. doi: 10.1016/j.ccm.2019.05.009.

Lung Transplant in Patients with Connective Tissue Diseases.

Author information

1
Lung Transplant Program, John and Doris Norton Thoracic Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, 500 West Thomas Road, Suite 500, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA; Creighton University School of Medicine (Phoenix Campus), Omaha, NE, USA. Electronic address: tspanchabhai@gmail.com.
2
Lung Transplant Program, John and Doris Norton Thoracic Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, 500 West Thomas Road, Suite 500, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA; Creighton University School of Medicine (Phoenix Campus), Omaha, NE, USA.
3
Creighton University School of Medicine (Phoenix Campus), Omaha, NE, USA; Thoracic Diseases and Transplantation, John and Doris Norton Thoracic Institute, Norton Thoracic Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, 500 West Thomas Road, Suite 500, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA.

Abstract

Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are autoimmune diseases that can result in end-stage interstitial lung diseases and pulmonary hypertension. Certain organ system dysfunctions have been thought to affect survival after lung transplant in patients diagnosed with CTDs. This article discusses the current data suggesting that clinical outcomes in patients with CTDs are similar to outcomes of patients who undergo lung transplant for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Larger studies focusing on the management of esophageal dysmotility and strategies of desensitization for increased antibody levels may result in approval of more patients with CTDs for lung transplant.

KEYWORDS:

Connective tissue disease; Esophageal dysmotility; Gastroesophageal reflux after lung transplant; Lung allocation score; Lung transplant; Scleroderma

PMID:
31376897
DOI:
10.1016/j.ccm.2019.05.009

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center