Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatr Diabetes. 2019 Aug 3. doi: 10.1111/pedi.12902. [Epub ahead of print]

Screening children for type 1 diabetes-associated antibodies at community health fairs.

Author information

1
Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is increasing, most notably in young children and in racial and ethnic minorities. Historically, screening for risk with T1D-associated antibodies has been limited to those with a family history, while up to 90% of newly diagnosed patients lack such a family history. To address the needs to screen diverse ethnic groups in the general population, we screened children for T1D-associated antibodies in the Denver, Colorado metro area at community health fairs.

METHODS:

Children attending health fairs from 2015 to 2018 were offered free T1D screening by measuring the four prototypical T1D-associated antibodies. A finger stick capillary puncture was performed to collect blood spots on filter paper. Dried blood spots (DBSs) were eluted and antibodies were measured using fluid-phase radio-binding assays.

RESULTS:

At 39 health fairs, children were educated on the signs and symptoms of diabetes, and screened for T1D-associated antibodies (n = 478), which represented 90% of those that attended. Median age was 9.0 years (range of 1-18) with diverse ethnic backgrounds: 37% Hispanic, 31% Caucasian, 20% African American, and 12% other. Nine children screened positive for antibodies, single n = 8 and multiple n = 1, and confirmation with serum samples showed excellent correlation to the measurements from DBSs for antibodies directed against GAD, IA-2, and ZnT8 (P < .01 for each).

CONCLUSIONS:

Screening for T1D risk at community health fairs using DBSs on filter paper is feasible and provides an avenue to screen children from ethnically diverse backgrounds.

KEYWORDS:

children; health fairs; islet autoantibodies; screening; type 1 diabetes

PMID:
31376227
DOI:
10.1111/pedi.12902

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center