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Neurotherapeutics. 2019 Jul;16(3):554-568. doi: 10.1007/s13311-019-00769-6.

Sleep as a Therapeutic Target in the Aging Brain.

Bah TM1, Goodman J1, Iliff JJ2,3,4,5,6.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.
2
Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA. jiliff@uw.edu.
3
Knight Cardiovascular Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA. jiliff@uw.edu.
4
Veterans Integrated Service Network 20 Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center, Puget Sound Health Care System, Mail Stop 116-MIRECC, 1660 South Columbian Way, Seattle, Washington, 98108, USA. jiliff@uw.edu.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA. jiliff@uw.edu.
6
Department of Neurology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA. jiliff@uw.edu.

Abstract

Sleep is a behavioral phenomenon conserved among mammals and some invertebrates, yet the biological functions of sleep are still being elucidated. In humans, sleep time becomes shorter, more fragmented, and of poorer quality with advancing age. Epidemiologically, the development of age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease is associated with pronounced sleep disruption, whereas emerging mechanistic studies suggest that sleep disruption may be causally linked to neurodegenerative pathology, suggesting that sleep may represent a key therapeutic target in the prevention of these conditions. In this review, we discuss the physiology of sleep, the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disease, and the current literature supporting the relationship between sleep, aging, and neurodegenerative disease.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; Sleep; aging; cognitive decline; dementia; treatment.

PMID:
31376067
PMCID:
PMC6694322
[Available on 2020-07-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s13311-019-00769-6

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