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Cell Rep. 2019 Jul 30;28(5):1154-1166.e5. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2019.06.071.

Activation of Astrocytic μ-Opioid Receptor Causes Conditioned Place Preference.

Author information

1
Center for Neuroscience, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 02792, Korea; Department of Science in Korean Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Korea.
2
Center for Neuroscience, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 02792, Korea; Department of Neuroscience, Division of Bio-Medical Science & Technology, KIST School, Korea University of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792, Korea.
3
Center for Neuroscience, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 02792, Korea.
4
Center for Neuroscience, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 02792, Korea; KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Korea; Center for Cognition and Sociality, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon 34126, Korea.
5
Center for Neuroscience, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 02792, Korea; Department of Neuroscience, Division of Bio-Medical Science & Technology, KIST School, Korea University of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792, Korea; Center for Cognition and Sociality, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon 34126, Korea.
6
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41940, Korea.
7
Department of Physiology and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University School of Dentistry, Seoul 03080, Korea.
8
Center for Neuroscience, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 02792, Korea; Center for Cognition and Sociality, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon 34126, Korea.
9
Virus Facility, Research Animal Resource Center, KIST, Seoul 02792, Korea.
10
New Drug Development Center, Daegu-Gyeongbuk Medical Innovation Foundation, Daegu 41061, Korea.
11
Department of Neuroscience, Division of Bio-Medical Science & Technology, KIST School, Korea University of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792, Korea; KHU-KIST Department of Converging Science and Technology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Korea; Convergence Research Center for Diagnosis, Treatment and Care System of Dementia, KIST, Seoul 02792, Korea.
12
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41940, Korea. Electronic address: ycbae@knu.ac.kr.
13
Center for Neuroscience, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 02792, Korea; Department of Neuroscience, Division of Bio-Medical Science & Technology, KIST School, Korea University of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792, Korea; Center for Cognition and Sociality, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon 34126, Korea. Electronic address: cjl@ibs.re.kr.

Abstract

The underlying mechanisms of how positive emotional valence (e.g., pleasure) causes preference of an associated context is poorly understood. Here, we show that activation of astrocytic μ-opioid receptor (MOR) drives conditioned place preference (CPP) by means of specific modulation of astrocytic MOR, an exemplar endogenous Gi protein-coupled receptor (Gi-GPCR), in the CA1 hippocampus. Long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by a subthreshold stimulation with the activation of astrocytic MOR at the Schaffer collateral pathway accounts for the memory acquisition to induce CPP. This astrocytic MOR-mediated LTP induction is dependent on astrocytic glutamate released upon activation of the astrocytic MOR and the consequent activation of the presynaptic mGluR1. The astrocytic MOR-dependent LTP and CPP were recapitulated by a chemogenetic activation of astrocyte-specifically expressed Gi-DREADD hM4Di. Our study reveals that the transduction of inhibitory Gi-signaling into augmented excitatory synaptic transmission through astrocytic glutamate is critical for the acquisition of contextual memory for CPP.

KEYWORDS:

astrocyte; conditioned place preference; hippocampus; long-term potentiation opioid; μ-opioid receptor

PMID:
31365861
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2019.06.071
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