Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acad Med. 2019 Jul 30. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000002914. [Epub ahead of print]

The Patient Experience Debrief Interview: How Conversations With Hospitalized Families Influence Medical Student Learning and Reflection.

Author information

1
I.S. Chua is assistant professor, Department of Pediatrics, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, and clinical instructor, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California. A.L. Bogetz is associate program director, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California. P. Bhansali is associate professor, Department of Pediatrics, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC. M. Long is associate professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. R. Holbreich is a medical student at George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC. T. Kind is professor of pediatrics and associate dean of clinical education at George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC. M. Ottolini is the vice chair of education and professor at Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC. Y.S. Park is associate professor, Department of Medical Education, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. M. Lineberry is assistant professor and director of simulation research, assessment, and outcomes at University of Kansas City Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas. L.E. Hirshfield is assistant professor, Department of Medical Education, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine the effect of patient debrief interviews on pediatric clerkship student depth of reflection and learning.

METHOD:

The authors conducted a multi-institutional, mixed-methods, cluster randomized trial among pediatric clerkship students from July 2016 to February 2017. Intervention students completed a debrief interview with a patient-caregiver, followed by a written reflection on the experience. Control students completed a written reflection on a memorable patient encounter. Three blinded authors scored written reflections according to the 4-level REFLECT rubric to determine depth of reflection. Inter-rater reliability was examined using kappa. REFLECT scores were analyzed using a chi-squared test; essays were analyzed using content analysis.

RESULTS:

Eighty percent of eligible students participated. One hundred eighty-nine essays (89 control, 100 intervention) were scored. Thirty-seven percent of the control group attained reflection and critical reflection, the two highest levels of reflection, compared to 71% in the intervention group; 2% of the control group attained critical reflection, the highest level, compared to 31% in the intervention group (χ(3, N=189) = 33.9, P < .001). Seven themes were seen across both groups, three focused on physician practice and four focused on patients. Patient-centered themes were more common in the intervention group whereas physician-focused themes were more common in the control group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patient debrief interviews offer a unique approach to deepen self-reflection through direct dialogue and exploration of patient-caregiver experiences during hospitalization.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center