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Biomaterials. 2019 Jul 25;219:119372. doi: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2019.119372. [Epub ahead of print]

A functionalized TiO2/Mg2TiO4 nano-layer on biodegradable magnesium implant enables superior bone-implant integration and bacterial disinfection.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; Shenzhen Key Laboratory for Innovative Technology in Orthopaedic Trauma, The University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Hospital, 1 Haiyuan 1st Road, Futian District, Shenzhen, China; College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, PR China.
2
Centre for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, 518055, China. Electronic address: yingzhao@126.com.
3
Department of Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China.
4
School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, China.
5
Centre for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, 518055, China.
6
State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.
7
School of Materials Science & Engineering, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology By the Ministry of Education of China, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072, China.
8
State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200050, China.
9
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
10
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; Shenzhen Key Laboratory for Innovative Technology in Orthopaedic Trauma, The University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Hospital, 1 Haiyuan 1st Road, Futian District, Shenzhen, China.
11
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; Shenzhen Key Laboratory for Innovative Technology in Orthopaedic Trauma, The University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Hospital, 1 Haiyuan 1st Road, Futian District, Shenzhen, China. Electronic address: wkkyeung@hku.hk.

Abstract

Rapid corrosion of biodegradable magnesium alloys under in vivo condition is a major concern for clinical applications. Inspired by the stability and biocompatibility of titanium oxide (TiO2) passive layer, a functionalized TiO2/Mg2TiO4 nano-layer has been constructed on the surface of WE43 magnesium implant by using plasma ion immersion implantation (PIII) technique. The customized nano-layer not only enhances corrosion resistance of Mg substrates significantly, but also elevates the osteoblastic differentiation capability in vitro due to the controlled release of magnesium ions. In the animal study, the increase of new bone formation adjacent to the PIII-treated magnesium substrate is 175% higher at post-operation 12 weeks, whereas the growth of new bone on titanium control and untreated magnesium substrate are only 97% and 29%, respectively. In addition, its Young's modulus can be restored to about 82% as compared with the surrounding matured bone. Furthermore, this specific TiO2/Mg2TiO4 layer even exhibits photoactive bacteria disinfection capability when irradiated by ultraviolet light which is attributed to the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. With all these constructive observations, it is believed that the TiO2/Mg2TiO4 nano-layer on magnesium implants can significantly promote new bone formation and suppress bacterial infection, while the degradation behavior can be controlled simultaneously.

KEYWORDS:

Bacteria disinfection; Biodegradable mg; Bone regeneration; Corrosion resistance; Titanium oxide nano-layer

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