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Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2019 Jul 29;23(9):68. doi: 10.1007/s11916-019-0806-9.

Chronic Headache: a Review of Interventional Treatment Strategies in Headache Management.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Stonybrook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA.
2
Department of Anesthesia, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
3
Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University School of Medicine and Durham Veterans Affairs Health Systems, 508 Fulton St, Durham, NC, 27705, USA.
4
Department of Anesthesia, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. Srinivas.pyati@duke.edu.
5
Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University School of Medicine and Durham Veterans Affairs Health Systems, 508 Fulton St, Durham, NC, 27705, USA. Srinivas.pyati@duke.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW:

To provide an overview of current interventional pain management techniques for primary headaches with a focus on peripheral nerve stimulation and nerve blocks.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Despite a plethora of treatment modalities, some forms of headaches remain intractable to conservative therapies. Interventional pain modalities have found a niche in treating headaches. Individuals resistant to common regimens, intolerant to pharmaceutical agents, or those with co-morbid factors that cause interactions with their therapies are some instances where interventions could be considered in the therapeutic algorithm. In this review, we will discuss these techniques including peripheral nerve stimulation, third occipital nerve block (TON), lesser occipital nerve block (LON), greater occipital nerve block (GON), sphenopalatine block (SPG), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and cervical epidural steroid injections (CESI). Physicians have used several interventional techniques to treat primary headaches. While many can be treated pharmacologically, those who continue to suffer from refractory or severe headaches may see tremendous benefit from a range of more invasive treatments which focus on directly inhibiting the painful nerves. While there is a plethora of evidence suggesting these methods are effective and possibly durable interventions, there is still a need for large, prospective, randomized trials to clearly demonstrate their efficacy.

KEYWORDS:

Cervicogenic headache; Greater occipital nerve block; Lesser occipital nerve block; Peripheral nerve stimulation; Radiofrequency ablation; Sphenopalatine block

PMID:
31359257
DOI:
10.1007/s11916-019-0806-9

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