Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Neurosci. 2019 Sep;22(9):1389-1393. doi: 10.1038/s41593-019-0451-y. Epub 2019 Jul 29.

Neural correlates of individual differences in affective benefit of real-life urban green space exposure.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, University of Heidelberg, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany. heike.tost@zi-mannheim.de.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, University of Heidelberg, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany.
3
Mental mHealth Lab, Department of Applied Psychology, Institute of Sports and Sports Science, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany.
4
Department of Biostatistics, Central Institute of Mental Health, University of Heidelberg, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany.
5
Institute of Geography, Department of GIScience, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany.
6
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, University of Heidelberg, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany. a.meyer-lindenberg@zi-mannheim.de.

Abstract

Psychiatric morbidity is high in cities, so identifying potential modifiable urban protective factors is important. We show that exposure to urban green space improves well-being in naturally behaving male and female city dwellers, particularly in districts with higher psychiatric incidence and fewer green resources. Higher green-related affective benefit was related to lower prefrontal activity during negative-emotion processing, which suggests that urban green space exposure may compensate for reduced neural regulatory capacity.

PMID:
31358990
DOI:
10.1038/s41593-019-0451-y

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center