Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Occup Environ Med. 2019 Oct;76(10):746-753. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2019-105706. Epub 2019 Jul 29.

Parental occupational exposure to low-frequency magnetic fields and risk of leukaemia in the offspring: findings from the Childhood Leukaemia International Consortium (CLIC).

Author information

1
Section of Environment and Radiation, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
2
Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
3
Childhood Cancer Research Group, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.
4
School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA.
5
Dipartimento di Medicina Traslazionale, SCDU Epidemiologia del Tumori, Universita' del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy.
6
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens & Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Athens, Greece.
7
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
8
Faculty of Social/Health Sciences, Tampereen yliopisto, Tampere, Finland.
9
Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
10
U1018, INSERM, Villejuif, France.
11
CESP UMRS-1018, Paris Sud University, Villejuif, France.
12
Epidemiology and Cancer Statistics Group, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, UK.
13
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
14
Faculty of Medicine and Biosciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
15
Tampere Center for Child Health Research, Tampere University Hospital and University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
16
Environmental and Occuaptional Epidemiology Unit, ISPO Cancer Prevention and Research Institute, Florence, Italy.
17
Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Previously published studies on parental occupational exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) and risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in their offspring were inconsistent. We therefore evaluated this question within the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

METHODS:

We pooled 11 case-control studies including 9723 childhood leukaemia cases and 17 099 controls. Parental occupational ELF-MF exposure was estimated by linking jobs to an ELF-MF job-exposure matrix (JEM). Logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs in pooled analyses and meta-analyses.

RESULTS:

ORs from pooled analyses for paternal ELF-MF exposure >0.2 microtesla (µT) at conception were 1.04 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.13) for ALL and 1.06 (95% CI 0.87 to 1.29) for AML, compared with ≤0.2 µT. Corresponding ORs for maternal ELF-MF exposure during pregnancy were 1.00 (95% CI 0.89 to 1.12) for ALL and 0.85 (95% CI 0.61 to 1.16) for AML. No trends of increasing ORs with increasing exposure level were evident. Furthermore, no associations were observed in the meta-analyses.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this large international dataset applying a comprehensive quantitative JEM, we did not find any associations between parental occupational ELF-MF exposure and childhood leukaemia.

KEYWORDS:

acute lymphoblastic leukemia; acute myeloid leukemia; case-control study; elf-mf; occupation

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center